Select:

Philip Yaure

Title | Organization: 
Graduate Student | Ph.D. program in Philosophy
Student Year: 
5th Year Ph.D. Student (Dissertation Phase)
 
Areas of Specialization:
Social and Political Philosophy; Philosophy of Race (esp. History of African American Political Thought); Early Modern Philosophy (esp. Locke)
 
Areas of Competence:
Feminist Philosophy, Ethics and Moral Philosophy
 
My research in social and political philosophy addresses the epistemic dimensions of emancipatory social movements. Combating oppressive institutions and ideologies requires, in part, changing how members of a political community understand their relations to other members of their community. My work in political epistemology— the study of the role of knowledge and understanding in political life— explores how emancipatory social movements characterize what it is to understand others as fellow members of one’s political community. I historically situate my work in the antebellum political thought of Black abolitionists such as Frederick Douglass and Martin Delany.

In my dissertation, I develop an account of what it is to understand others as fellow members of one’s political community through an interpretation of the antebellum political thought of Black American abolitionists Frederick Douglass and Martin Delany. On the account I defend, members of a political community acknowledge others as fellow members through responsiveness to their fellows’ enactment of the community’s political values. I acknowledge you as a fellow citizen in virtue of what you do, and my acknowledgement of you as a fellow citizen consists in action that responds to what you do. Understanding others as fellow members of one’s political community is, on this account, a form of practical knowledge. I argue that a political epistemology of acknowledgement and its corresponding picture of political membership offer a viable model for transforming political actors’ understanding of who their fellow citizens are, despite the influence of oppressive ideology.

I also have substantial interests in the value of political participation, the nature of moral and political standing, and the role of humility in political life.

 
Publications:
“Deliberation and Emancipation: Some Critical Remarks,” Ethics 129(1), October 2018